Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Something for Everyone


What a wonderful and busy little park at Mosquito Lake. We may have to take Lucy one day.






Comments on my Weds. posts hinted that this lake has a less than inviting name. I agree. So I'm including a little history and I assure you it is a fresh and lovely lake surrounded by fantastic recreation facilities.

Mosquito Creek Lake was named for the pesky insects that inhabited the marshy area. But thanks to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers . . .  What started out as a flood control project for surrounding rivers in 1944, Mosquito Creek Lake has developed into one of the most popular sites for outdoor recreation in the area over the past 61 years. These last six decades has brought promise to the lake with the development of five launch ramps, campgrounds and picnic areas, swimming beach, and many hiking trails to enjoy. Mosquito Lake draws lovers of the outdoors not only from the surrounding counties but from throughout Ohio and its bordering states.

Cross a fence and head on over to Good Fences here.

Mosquito Lake History

What started out as a flood control project for surrounding rivers in 1944, Mosquito Creek Lake has developed into one of the most popular sites for out

Mosquito Lake History

What started out as a flood control project for surrounding rivers in 1944, Mosquito Creek Lake has developed into one of the most popular sites for outdoor recreation in the area over the past 61 years. These last six decades has brought promise to the lake with the development of five launch ramps, campgrounds and picnic areas, swimming beach, and many hiking trails to enjoy. Mosquito Lake draws lovers of the outdoors not only from the surrounding counties but from throughout Ohio and its bordering states.
Mosquito Creek Lake was named for the pesky insects that inhabited the marshy area, but that did not keep the avid fishermen away from the lake. The legend of the name is based upon two traveling brothers from Cleveland setting off towards Youngstown. The brothers were transporting a large iron kettle in their wagon, which was used for boiling salt from mineral water. During their journey, they came upon a swampy stream where they decided to make camp for the night. While they were sleeping, a huge swarm of mosquitoes attacked and to escape from the deadly "blood-sucking" insects, they overturned the iron kettle and crawled under it for protection. Legend has it that months later, a group of travelers came across the a deserted camp where they found the wagon, skeletons of two horses and a kettle with small holes in it. Underneath the iron kettle were the skeletal remains of the two traveling brothers. From the legendary attack of the deadly swarms of insects, the murky stream was named Mosquito Creek. The name remained as the creek was built into a lake in 1944. door recreation in the area over the past 61 years. These last six decades has brought promise to the lake with the development of five launch ramps, campgrounds and picnic areas, swimming beach, and many hiking trails to enjoy. Mosquito Lake draws lovers of the outdoors not only from the surrounding counties but from throughout Ohio and its bordering states.

Mosquito Creek Lake was named for the pesky insects that inhabited the marshy area, but that did not keep the avid fishermen away from the lake. The legend of the name is based upon two traveling brothers from Cleveland setting off towards Youngstown. The brothers were transporting a large iron kettle in their wagon, which was used for boiling salt from mineral water. During their journey, they came upon a swampy stream where they decided to make camp for the night. While they were sleeping, a huge swarm of mosquitoes attacked and to escape from the deadly "blood-sucking" insects, they overturned the iron kettle and crawled under it for protection. Legend has it that months later, a group of travelers came across the a deserted camp where they found the wagon, skeletons of two horses and a kettle with small holes in it. Underneath the iron kettle were the skeletal remains of the two traveling brothers. From the legendary attack of the deadly swarms of insects, the murky stream was named Mosquito Creek. The name remained as the creek was built into a lake in 1944. 

7 comments:

  1. yup, that name is a bit off-putting. :) but glad it is well-used.

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  2. Well kept amenities like this park are valuable assets in our communities and this one looks good!

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  3. Hello, the name would make a person think twice. Looks like a great park for the doggies. Have a happy day!

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  4. I just picture early settlers coming to the area and giving it that name....

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  5. sounds like a place i would not want to visit. i always wonder why mosquitoes, ticks and snakes do exist?. they are not nice creatures. ( :

    fence hopping.

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  6. Neat fence shots ~

    too many signs for me ~ and not fond of dog parks either ~ dogs should be allowed to run and be leashed if needed in public ~ I take mine to the beach off season to let her run ~ Cold but good for both of us ~

    Happy Week to you ~ ^_^

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  7. Oh I'm glad I read the explanation about the way the area got it's name. I don't think I would visit if I thought there were lots of mosquitos there. - Looks like a really nice area and the dogs look to be having fun there.

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