Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Wildbird Wednesday 012016

House Finch - Titmouse - Junco - Female Cardinal - Male Cardinal

SMITHSONIAN
How do birds―especially the little delicate guys like chickadees and titmice―survive the single-digit temperatures and whipping winds of winter?
It turns out that birds (even the little guys) aren’t so delicate after all, and they’ve got a few tricks up their sleeve (uh, wing), too.
Their first layer of defense against the cold is their outer-most one: feathers. There’s a good reason why people love down-filled winter coats―feathers are fantastic insulation.
“Feathers are incredibly specialized structures that serve many purposes including, for many species, keeping them warm,” says 
“Birds’ feathers provide remarkable insulation against the cold, and the oil that coats feathers also provides waterproofing, which is important since the only thing worse than being cold, is being cold and wet,” Peter Marra, head of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center at the National Zoo.

Joining Stewart for:

8 comments:

  1. That is a wonderful capture of Mrs. Cardinal...not that the others aren't great. It is just bit beyond.

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  2. God's way of protecting birds is perfect. Lovely shots

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  3. Our feathered friends are a hardy species, and you captures are beautiful.

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  4. Yes, and it makes you wonder why some birds take their feathers south to warmer weather and others don't. But I had come to the conclusion that they had a way of dealing with the cold as I have watched them make it through days that I wouldn't go out in. I do know, they also need food to keep them warm, so it is important, even more important to keep your feeders full in the winter. I know many people who only put out food in the warm weather ... a time when nature is providing for them as well. These are lovely pictures, Gayle. I have all of these birds at my feeder except the Titmouse. For some reason, we never get a Titmouse and I think they are so adorable. Have a great week ...

    Andrea @ From The Sol

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  5. Several have been at my feeders today and I was wondering how they were surviving out there!

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